Be part of Bahrain history for a day

Be part of Bahrain history for a day

Be part of Bahrain history for a day

BY SHAHD ALHAMDAN   IN a land that traces its history to the Dilmun civilization, one of the oldest civilizations in the Middle East, and boasts a rich heritage and culture, the Kingdom of Bahrain is one of the lush hubs in the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) where tourists can explore many historical monuments and spaces that tell stories of the past.     Here is an overview of several prominent places visitors to Bahrain can enjoy. Bahrain National museum     Visitors are taken into a journey down memory lane with the history of Bahrain slowly revealing itself through dozens of artifacts. The museum offers archaeological artifacts of the Dilmun civilization, Islamic civilizations and a glimpse of Bahraini culture.   Inside, visitors are greeted to a giant map of Bahrain on the floor. There is also a section dedicated to the reproduction souk covering traditional trades and crafts as well as traditions, weddings and the daily lives of Bahrainis throughout the years. Information about several old forts including Arad Fort abounds. Arad Fort   It is considered to be one of the vital forts in Bahrain’s history since it played a major role in the defense of Bahrain against marauders through the centuries. The fort, which experienced diverse construction phases, has a sea view. The entry fee for this castle is around SR5.  The Fort closes at 2 p.m. so plan your trip accordingly!   Bahrain fort or ‘Qal'at Al-Bahrain   Founded in 2300 BC, various occupants lived in it and rebuilt it including the Dilmuns and Portuguese colonizers. In 2005, it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. Nearby, there is a museum that has other information about the fort. It is closed on Mondays.   The Mohammed Bin Faris Sut Music House Launched in 2005 as a museum commemorating the achievements of the Bahraini singer and musician Mohammed Bin Faris, people can enjoy the performances of Arabic music bands every Thursday evening. Also, there is an artistic space where people can write their wishes or quotes in a book and then throw a paper dart into the space.   Maison Jamsheer   A Bahraini house that is located in Muharraq and was built in the late 1800s. Today, it has the Bahraini-French cultural center and several events and classes are held in this house, which was previously the home of the Jamsheer family before it was transformed to its current status.   Muharraq Souq   People can enjoy buying Bahraini products including, Matthias and spices. It also offers a wide range of merchandise and famed sweet shops. Visitors can enjoy eating in one of the local traditional restaurants here appropriately called My Mother’s Kitchen. Visiting the oldest section of the Souq, which is Al Qaisariya, is a must since it offers a charming shopping experience. What makes the souq a special place is that several historic spots surround it and store keepers are very friendly.