Traffic consultative assembly

Traffic consultative assembly

Khalid Al-Suliman

By Khalid Al-Suliman   WHY does it sometimes seem hard for traffic wardens to satisfactorily meet the requirements of wider society? Traffic wardens are perhaps the only government body people deal with on a daily basis. As a result, evaluating its performance on the ground needs to take place continuously. Just pass by a traffic warden and notice qualified men who put so much effort into managing traffic. However, the problem does not lie in the traffic laws or techniques. There needs to be an office and staff who could implement plans and achieve goals. There is a lack of people on our streets. This is a fact no one has the courage to mention. It is not just limited to the lack of employees, there is also a struggle with some traffic wardens not performing their duties properly. Consequently, it is necessary to review standards, evaluate staff and salaries, and introduce perks that would motivate staff to perform better. This is something we should not forget. Traffic wardens do not have a monopoly in managing traffic. This responsibility is shared with other government administrations such as the Ministry of Transport and city municipalities. As a result of this, finding solutions to problems becomes a complicated and bureaucratic process. I would like to suggest forming a traffic consultative assembly. This assembly could consist of qualified individuals as well as Saudis with degrees in traffic management and safety. I would also like to recommend establishing a club for volunteers who are willing to contribute to work on the ground and spread awareness about traffic safety. On the long term, I suggest establishing special companies that would be responsible for observing and charging drivers who wrongly park their vehicles. The fines should be severe when it comes to penalizing people who park in the areas designated for people with special needs.